Denmark

Battle of Jutland Centenary Expedition

It is hard to put into words what I was feeling at this stage. I was descending the shot line in approximately 15m visibility and an image started to appear. Not the random wreckage you often see, or even the straight lines of a cargo ship, instead these were two long barrels. This was no ordinary wreck—I was looking at the ‘X’ Turret of HMS Invincible.

Sonar scan of HMS Tarpon resting on the seabed

WW2 British sub HMS Tarpon found off Jutland

HMS Tarpon left Portsmouth on 5 April 1940 and ordered to Norway. On the 10th Tarpon was ordered to take up a new position but was never heard from again. Post War German records showed that Tarpon had attacked the Q-ship Schiff 40/Schürbek, but her first torpedoes had missed. A sustained counterattack that went on most of the morning finally brought wreckage to the surface and it became clear the submarine had been sunk.

Maritime Archaeology Program at University of Southern Denmark

Divers build a frame, which they will later bring to the surface with the help of a lift bag. Photo courtesy of the Maritime Archaeology Program at the University of Southern Denmark.

In 2006, a postgraduate program in maritime archaeology was established at the University of Southern Denmark. Based in Esbjerg, on the west coast of the Jutland Peninsula in southwestern Denmark, it is a one-of-a-kind university program in this centuries-old seafaring nation. The program is designed for students who want to pursue a professional career in maritime archaeology and heritage management.

The Hunt For S8

Below some ragged pieces of wreckage lying on the bottom beside the hull, I see something a little out of place. It’s more polished and more regular in its outline. I carefully descend and remove the pieces of metal that hide it. My colleague, Marcus Runesson, is above me providing ample light, making my task much easier.