Medical & Fitness

The decreasing availability of treatment facilities willing or able to provide emergency hyperbaric treatment when we need it most increases our risk as divers.
The decreasing availability of treatment facilities willing or able to provide emergency hyperbaric treatment when we need it most increases our risk as divers.

Emergency Hyperbaric Treatment Availability affected by Covid-19 crisis

The standard of care for many diving illnesses is recompression. Treatment delay is one of the most significant risk factors for a negative outcome when treating divers with decompression sickness or arterial gas embolism. Hence, an injured diver must be brought to the most appropriate, available treatment facility with as little delay as possible.

Time to read
less than
1 minute
Read so far

Join the DAN Team and Help Make Diving Safer

Fri, 27/08/2021 - 00:01

• DAN seeks a safety services coordinator to support its educational, safety-development, and outreach programs. Duties include monitoring and developing injury-prevention initiatives and fielding risk mitigation and training inquiries. This person will communicate with dive operators, dive professionals, and the public about mitigating risk and promoting operational safety in diving.

(File photo) Hyperbaric chamber at Rigshospitalet, the Danish national hospital
(File photo) Hyperbaric chamber at Rigshospitalet, the Danish national hospital

Hyperbaric chambers in NW Florida unavailable to divers

In a region already woefully short of adequate hyperbaric emergency services for divers, chambers from Mississippi to Northwest Florida are reportedly now filling up with Covid-19 patients fighting for their lives.

As reported earlier on this site, the closest decompression chambers to the popular Oriskany dive site and Florida Panhandle Shipwreck Trail are in Mobile, Alabama which is out of state—or in Fort Myers, more than 600 miles away.

Time to read
less than
1 minute
Read so far

DAN Enhances Return To Diving Guide With Video

Wed, 07/07/2021 - 20:40

Available at DAN.org/Return, the guide has helped thousands of people get back in the water safely in the past few months. Now, this new video brings the guide to life, highlighting the essential elements of a safe and successful return to diving after time away. 

Time to read
less than
1 minute
Read so far

Richard Moon, M.D., Named 2021 DAN/Rolex Diver of the Year

Mon, 07/06/2021 - 21:14

Dr. Moon is a professor of anesthesiology at Duke University and the medical director of the Duke Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology. He is also a former medical director of DAN.

Throughout his 40-year career in dive medicine and research, Dr. Moon has sought to gain a better understanding of cardiorespiratory function on the human body when subjected to environmental conditions such as being deep underwater or at high altitude.

Time to read
less than
1 minute
Read so far

DAN Welcomes 2021 Research and Safety Interns

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 22:20

The DAN Internship Program was created more than 20 years ago to give qualifiedstudents valuable experience in dive safety research. While the program is still research-oriented, its scope has expanded over the years to include projects that focus on other facets of DAN’s mission to help divers in need of emergency medical assistance and to promote dive safety through education. 

Clockwise from top right: Grant Dong, Christine Tamburri, Gabriel Graf, Rhiannon Brenner, Benjamin Kistler
Time to read
less than
1 minute
Read so far

DAN Launches 2021 Webinar Series

Thu, 14/01/2021 - 01:06

Throughout 2021, experts from DAN’s Research, Risk Mitigation, and Medical Servicesteams will give presentations on topics relevant to divers, dive pros and dive business owners as we look beyond the COVID-19 pandemic and resume diving and traveling.

Stings & Scrapes - Part 1

While the most exotic of these potentially dangerous organisms are fairly well known, the more mundane sometimes cause uncertainty. Know what’s most likely to cause an injury on your next dive so you can relax and enjoy making bubbles.

In part one of this two-part series we’ll refresh your knowledge of wound care and treating common marine stings; next month we’ll cover injuries that involve scrapes, bites and penetrating wounds.